Portable Electric Spas

THE PRODUCT:

Portable electric spas are free-standing hot tubs that are electrically heated. 

THE STANDARD:

California adopted the first standard for portable electric spas in 2004. The standard set a maximum limit on standby power consumption based on the volume of water a spa holds. Standby power refers to the energy consumed to maintain the temperature set point and to circulate and filter the water when the spa is not being used. In 2007, standards equivalent to the California standard were adopted by Connecticut and Oregon. Arizona and Washington subsequently adopted equivalent standards in 2009.

In 2014, the American National Standard Institute (ANSI) approved a new industry standard for portable electric spa efficiency (ANSI/APSP/ICC 14-2014), which was developed by the Association of Pool and Spa Professionals (APSP) and other stakeholders. The new ANSI standard sets a more stringent limit on allowable standby power consumption. The California Energy Commission is currently conducting a rulemaking to consider updated standards for portable electric spas.

KEY FACTS:

More than five million US households have spas. Typical portable electric spas waste a significant amount of energy through heat loss when the spa is not being used. A typical 300-gallon spa just meeting the current California standard uses more than 200 W of standby power, or about 1,750 kWh per year. For comparison, an average new refrigerator uses about 500 kWh per year.

Projected Savings

Timeline

Federal Date States
2012 AZ Standard Effective
2010 WA Standard Effective
2009 OR Standard Effective
2009 AZ Standard Adopted
2009 WA Standard Adopted
2009 CT Standard Effective
2007 OR Standard Adopted
2007 CT Standard Adopted
2006 CA Standard Effective
2004 CA Standard Adopted

Timeline reflects state standards from 2001 to present; federal standards from inception to present.