States

State Standards

States have historically led the nation in the development of new appliance standards. A typical progression begins with a state, usually California, setting an efficiency standard for a particular product. Other states then adopt identical or similar standards. Once several states have adopted standards, manufacturers of the affected products will often negotiate with the states and efficiency advocacy groups in order to develop a consensus recommendation for a national standard. In general, manufacturers, distributors and retailers prefer national standards over a state-by-state patchwork. Consensus recommendations for new standards have formed the basis for nearly all initial national standards.  

By setting appliance efficiency standards, states can decrease energy use, save consumers and businesses money, and reduce greenhouse gases and other pollutants. Usually new state standards cover products for which there are no existing national standards because, with limited exceptions, national standards preempt state standards. We provide the information below to assist state energy offices, legislators, and policy advocates.

Resources

If you’d like information about… Go to…
Current state standards Status of State Efficiency Standards 
Historical state standards State Standards adopted since 2001 and Product Chart 
Setting standards in your state and potential savings from state standards

Contact Marianne at mdimascio@standardsasap.org

Current state policies and incentives for renewables and efficiency Link to DSIRE (Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency)
State-by-state savings from national appliance standards

Interactive map and White Paper (2017)

State Adoption of Energy Efficiency Standards

The following table includes only those efficiency standards that states are responsible for enforcing. Many standards adopted by states since 2001 have subsequently been enacted federally and are now the responsibility of the federal government. They are not included in this table. For a historical listing of state standards, see: State Standards adopted since 2001

The date indicated is the year of adoption (not the effective year).

Notes:
a. Year indicates the date the standard was adopted.
b. CA metal halide fixture standards are exempt from federal preemption
c. CA accelerates 2020 general service incandescent standards to 2018
d. This table only includes standards which states are responsible for enforcing. Many standards enacted by states since 2001 have subsequently been enacted federally and are now the responsibility of the federal government. They are not included in this table.
e. New York's Appliance Standards law requires that the standards levels be developed through a regulatory process. Standards will be included on this table when the levels have been determined.